Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Wrenching it


When we traded for this old John Deere we still had the cows. I have sat upon it many times running the PTO to dispense feed for whomever was feeding them that day. I liked that job if I wasn't setting up and washing stuff in the milk house. There is a lot of time to ponder life and watch the sky while waiting to shove that lever.....


The tractor has always knocked. Always.

Borked

Anyhow the knock got serious recently so Alan had the boss park it while he looked it over to see what was going on and ordered some parts.

Borked vs unborked

Yesterday he and Jade tore it down and applied a fix that should get it through whatever hay weather we get the rest of the season. At one point it was barely recognizable as a tractor at all.

At least some of the tools were supplied by the farm girl

Then they need to replace a shaft in it, which clearly was defective right from the factory. They figure that some of the parts were designed to let it wobble!

Peggy and Uncle Alan wrenching on the tractors (Photo stolen from Liz who took it)

Anyhow there was a lot of grease and southern clay (still caked here and there from its original home) involved. Even though Peggy wasn't feeling the best, she got her own green tractor out and wrenched on it too. It was fixed quite quickly, as she was tired and wanted to rest. The big one will do for now as long as the boss babies it. No asking it to toss bales all the way to the back of the wagon until they have time to replace that shaft.

2 comments:

Terry and Linda said...

We just had to have a whole new thingy put in the tractor with the loader. Terry's work horse. Terry split the tractor in-two...then ordered a gear and some other stuff from way back there in New York State (antique tractor parts or someplace like that---all our stuff is now antique or classic). The folks helped him out right smart the whole assembly came to $1,500.00. He said it was much cheaper than a new tractor.

It's back and running. I admire folks like Terry and your men who know how to fix stuff. Peggy is following in good footsteps.

Linda

threecollie said...

Linda, we are so fortunate! These jobs cost a fortune if you have a dealer do them! Alan has split tractors before at a friend's place, but we simply don't have the facilities to do it very often. Big job!